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  • leedian

    hi

    6 Ott 2013 Rispondi
  • bashiechan

    Definitely agree about the Japanese development of freeform styles within the context of their cultural sphere. It definitely merits individual study, as it's something that so many Western improvisers have failed to understand, much less play with...

    23 Giu 2012 Rispondi
  • bashiechan

    Hey man, sorry for being so late to respond. I've been so busy with language learning, classes, and preparations for my upcoming trip. How've you been? Sorry I couldn't make it to that ATP thing. I would have liked to have gone, but the ticket prices were rather steep. Free imrpov: yeah, I mean, obviously just because a musician is playing a certain way, doesn't automatically mean that it's good. Just like any other form I think it depends on your individual inclinations, although the capacity for surprise, if not necessarily greater, is at least of a much more distinct quality in enjoying any music of a freeform bent. It's that distinctness that appeals me, I suppose :)

    23 Giu 2012 Rispondi
  • bashiechan

    The last train issue is always a challenge, especially when you're travelling outside London. I have this problem a lot in Cambridge, not that I've seen many gigs there, but there's a wonderful little cinema in the town centre that I love to visit a few times a year - and it can be difficult to swing late night showings, as the last train back to my town is at something ridiculous like quarter to 11 :( Hm. I can understand if the totally unhinged nature of 'non-idiomatic' improvisation isn't your thing (personally, Derek Bailey is a monolithic hero to me - but I can understand how it's not everyone's bag) - but if you're more into improvisation in the sense of building/expanding themes and atmosphere, you might like The Necks - a great trio of live/electronic musicians who improvise by working with a basic theme and following the sound as it develops :) Don't worry so much about expressing yourself! You do it marvellously, irrespective of what you think. Love your website, by the way!

    12 Mag 2012 Rispondi
  • bashiechan

    Ahh! I totally misplaced you on Britain's small and (seemingly) uncomplicated map. My apologies! :) I still think Spiderland is a phenomenal record, it holds up to some of the best rock song music that I've been exposed to over the years. I love its layers of guitar, the effervescent lyrics, and sonically the way that half the album is basically an incredibly emotionally repressed crescendo that unravels in slow-motion - before imploding in a volatile climax. That's how I interpret it, anyway :)

    3 Mag 2012 Rispondi
  • bashiechan

    If you live near Brighton, I'm quite surprised that you elected to attend the Weasel Walter Trio's london date and not their gig at the self-same coastal city you call home only a few days later... I actually scraped by the fare to go down and see that one, having felt the Cafe Oto show was a little underwhelming. I make no secret of the fact that I don't think much of that venue in terms of its set-up/staff/clientele, although I am simultaneously enticed by its increasingly influential reach with masses of people who are suddenly receptive to extremely difficult and at times downright labyrinthe forms of sound art... so many mixed feelings :) As for riffage in rock-based improv: you should definitely check out Dead Days Beyond Help, then! Alex's work in this unit incorporates a great deal of composed/song material into his ubiquitous propensity for on-the-fly creation. In DDBH's 2nd to last gig he opened with some sludgy death metal ballad.

    3 Mag 2012 Rispondi
  • bashiechan

    I'll be in Poland for at least 2 months from July, and it's very possible I'll be moving there shortly after my trip. :-) I guess it depends on whether or not it's feasible to find any work. In other words, it depends on me. We'll definitely run into each other at a gig sometime soon! I'll let you know if I plan on going to anything with a bit more advance notice next time. I notice you've got a few lined up in Brighton... (I'd go & see Melvins, I've seen them 3 or 4 times and every time they're even better than before) but you live at/near Peterborough, if I remember correctly? I could very well be mistaken.

    2 Mag 2012 Rispondi
  • bashiechan

    Yeah! Alexander was using what looked like a tape deck and floppy discs, along with his elaborate array of pedals, mixing boards, and various other electronics. I'm sort of acquainted with A. Ward, but I'm generally just a really big fan of his music. I particularly love his solo clarinet material and his work with Dead Days Beyond Help. I can't think of any other multi-instrumentalist musician in the UK who is so adept and simultaneously well-versed in so many different styles of music, from traditional jazz, to free improv, to country-western, to prog-rock, to death metal... it's the promise of every gig being something new, exciting, frenzied, and unpredictable that keeps me following his artistic progress. Although the man has long been sick of my antics :) I remember enjoying Slint and thinking how young they still looked, although their live performance was nothing to write home about. Tucker's cello-guitar and headrush pedal layer looping was what stuck with me more vividly.

    2 Mag 2012 Rispondi
  • bashiechan

    Couldn't agree more about Duke Garwood - it sounded and looked like a fairly typical sclerotic pub regular tripping up to the mic in a tipsy haze to do some predictable acoustic night 'blues' thing. It was the most stereotypical, insipid performance I'd witnessed in ages - and I haven't even been to any gigs recently! Alexander Tucker was surprising, though, his sound and modus operandi has altered significantly since I last saw him support Slint in 2006. His music is entirely electronics-based now, and very dense with the choppy, layered squelches. Gone are the doom/folk influences since he ditched the guitar. It was definitely not what I expected, but eye-opening and energetic all the same :)

    29 Apr 2012 Rispondi
  • bashiechan

    Steve - I would have definitely mentioned the Richard Bishop gig to you had I not found out about it the afternoon of the event (twitter! hah) and was decisively planning on attending. Beyond attempting FNM on the 8th (the Brixton date is impossible, as I'm flying to Poland on the 10th!), I don't know when I'll next venture into London. This evening I'm planning on going to see a performance by Dead Days Beyond Help (the prog-rock duo featuring Alex Ward) staging a live soundtrack to a dance production by the Sign Dance collective in East Croydon. http://sites.google.com/site/signdancecollective/signdance-productions - it's the last night of the residency, and I will do my damndest to attend, being a huge fan of those guys /and/ because I didn't get the chance to see them in this context previously. Think you'd like to come along? :)

    29 Apr 2012 Rispondi
  • bashiechan

    Anyone who references both JG Ballard and the spectre of Laura Palmer in the same breath while discussing the sleep-wake frequency undulations is a genius in my book. It would have been nice to have seen Faith No More just once, anyway, especially as it was never a possibility during the years I actually heard them. I'm sure it's the same for many people. Who knows, perhaps one can have better luck some time down the line... :) I envy you for always having so many gigs in the pipeline! I went to see Sir Richard Bishop in London the other night and I sorely wish you were there. You would've enjoyed the polytheistic quandary that is his guitar playing.

    28 Apr 2012 Rispondi
  • bashiechan

    Oh.. and fix your sleep!!! Don't underestimate the potency of regular, plentiful sleeping arrangements :D

    23 Apr 2012 Rispondi
  • bashiechan

    :/ The General sale prices might be a little daunting, but look at it this way: £37.50 compared to how much you'd probably have to shell out from a touty rapscallion on eBay, the streets, or some other means of disreputable trading - so if you thought you'd want to come later down the line, I'd say it's definitely worth shelling out for and acting now to avoid the hellish scrambling that would ensue later. I myself will try hard to get tickets tomorrow morning... if you really wanted to come I guess you could sacrifice a few other gigs in the pipeline :) Good luck with it anyways, and really hope you can swing it!

    23 Apr 2012 Rispondi
  • runout_groove

    Hey, saw you went to a previous Sunn O))) London show - just a heads up they'll be back in London soon w/ Nurse With Wound - http://www.last.fm/event/3188700

    12 Apr 2012 Rispondi
  • sankathi

    that was last year right? the la free music society thing?

    21 Gen 2012 Rispondi
  • bashiechan

    No... I haven't :( The only other Lol album I've spun was one of his very early (possibly his debut) solo releases from the 70s. As far as I can recall, it was mostly him solo on sax, with occasional guests, and a fair bit of narration and generous helpings of traditional English folk duets with vocals. I'd certainly love to check out more. I've seen him live a couple of times while traversing the London free improv/jazz circle, playing with anyone who happened to also have an instrument to hand. We should definitely hang out soon :) You're near Peterborough, right? The Saturday of that ATP looks mighty juicy. Will have to see what my situation is closer to the time. That Michael Gira date looks sorely tempting too...

    11 Gen 2012 Rispondi
  • bashiechan

    Hey Steve - I'm sure he wouldn't have been bewildered at all! But even if he was, I totally understand. Most jazz guys I approach with gushing accolades usually look completely baffled. They must secretly appreciate it, though. :) This Miller / Coxhill album is a masterpiece, I love the swooning, innocently pastoral themes intertwined with extensive farmyard roving. It is fascinating to hear how the sax and the painist respond to one another, as their musical approaches seem quite distinct. I've been listening to it non-stop. How've you been, by the way? Hope you've had enjoyable holidays. We should hang out again soon :)

    2 Gen 2012 Rispondi
  • freakscene90

    tight taste man.

    13 Dic 2011 Rispondi
  • bashiechan

    You weren't rude at all, man :) I wasn't offended in the least, just concerned. Your inherently vagabond nature is most curious to me. Inevitably as you drift closer to the start of the week, such pianos tend to be accessible from higher floors and more treacherous angles. Water, as with most elemental forms, has its own plans. Despite tight manoeuvres, it is always rewarding when you get to the keys. There is always a way with a piano. Always. :)

    6 Lug 2011 Rispondi
  • bashiechan

    You're totally nuts... roaming around London during dead hours in lieu of, oh, I dunno, getting some goddamn rest? :) But, I am glad you're okay. Don't ever be a stranger, y'hear?

    30 Giu 2011 Rispondi
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