Vastarien

What the fuck am I doing here?, 23, Maschio, Stati UnitiUltimo accesso: Ottobre 2010

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  • purplehazethc

    Krallice suck.

    14 Mar 2012 Rispondi
  • ANYMAL91

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KjA0A3IAkp0 enjoy

    6 Mar 2011 Rispondi
  • birrie666

    i really dig your charts and your sidebar shit. stay true! fuck the human race.

    13 Ott 2010 Rispondi
  • Scriabinist

    I asked her about that piece, she said she might be able to fetch an mp3. She also said she remembers meeting the composition students at your place and conversing with them. Did you meet her personally? The other day we were talking about the necessary steps it takes to becoming a successful composer-- it was really depressing, haha. ALSO she met Murail. Alright enough ha. As for Godspeed, it's a very real possibility that you'd enjoy their debut LP. It's incredibly depressing and apocalyptic. Almost all post-rock makes me want to kill everyone but me and then me, but Godspeed pulls off the minimalist rock thing on a somewhat orchestral scale... it's like chamber rock, which is a very interesting concept to me. But you should totally go for that first one. I didn't see Katatonia, unfortunately. I'll get to see Agalloch this December if my finals don't coincide with the show (and if they do, fuck)

    6 Ott 2010 Rispondi
  • Scriabinist

    ahhaha, she played an excerpt of Evryali for me and I fell out of my chair and died. She's all into modernist shit which is great because now I finally have someone to talk to in person about the music my ears consume. [check her out: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xi3z4L61bj8] my sister used to live there so I've visited your town a few times. It's obviously nice as a tourist destination, but I couldn't imagine spending every day there. The thing is I'm practicing wayyy more now, generally around 6-8 hours a day, but it's not because the school is encouraging me to become a better musician blah blah blah, I think it's because I'm using it as a distraction from life because this city is such a horrible shitty place to live. So maybe it's better to live in a horrible place if you're looking to develop as a musician. Portland was so full of distractions... Seattle is just boring buildings and cars and scary homeless people. ahaha, I'm a hipster at heart, yeah ▲▲▲. Do you like Godspeed? ▲

    23 Set 2010 Rispondi
  • Scriabinist

    ah! I haven't heard that one. Interpretation is such a vital aspect of classical music as well, especially when you get used to one recording, it makes another sound off... I'm going to look into that though because the Polyansky take on the fourth symphony is my favorite interpretation of the work. As for reach, I can do a tenth in my right hand and uncomfortably do an eleventh in my left hand. It's weird, heh. How great would that be to have Rachmaninoff hands? The Scriabin 6 commands such a massive gravity, what a demonic work! One of my favorites of his alongside 7 & 10, the latter being completely out-of-this-world. Oh that dramatic little man and his silly moustache. You're familiar with Mysterium, yes? I recently almost went after the seventh, but decided on Berg's piano sonata instead. I'm lucky enough to have an incredible instructor this semester. She's played solo works by XENAKIS yeah that's right. Oh and if you don't mind me asking, what's so bad about your town?

    20 Set 2010 Rispondi
  • ShockSim

    What are your thoughts on Blood Revolt's album Indoctrine? Do the vocals appeal to you?

    16 Set 2010 Rispondi
  • ShockSim

    I can't say I'm a huge fan of Satanic Warmaster (for the simple reason that the material is a little too derivative/generic in my view) but Strength and Honour is a pretty good album. Well, I say pretty good - I've only listened to the record once in its entirety, so it may still grow on me yet! 'The Burning Eyes of the Werewolf' is definitely my favourite track - a real standout. Have you listened to the acoustic version from the 2008 split with Behexen?

    16 Set 2010 Rispondi
  • Scriabinist

    I'll get back to you on miserable pieces, have to look through my library. I also might be transforming into you-- I love Schnittke and fucking hate where I live, haha. Seattle is a constant headache. AND I can't download music up here so woohoo.

    13 Set 2010 Rispondi
  • Scriabinist

    The concerto for piano and string orchestra is one of my favorites as well. I poked through the score and was 200% perplexed by the string parts in some of those sections, like where each of the 22 players has a different part-- how can you be sitting down writing notes on paper and simply hear such a complex array of counterpoint in your head? It's beyond me (for now, hehe). Are you listening to the Rozhdestvensky/USSR Ministry of Culture Orchestra take on the second symphony or an alternate performance? Thanks for the input on the fourth. It's such a perfect work. From what I've gathered, the three note trichord sets are intended to represent the three sects of Christianity alongside other pieces of religious symbolism that run throughout the work. There are a few pages of the book about the fourth symphony if I recall. Mastering your masters' techniques does sound like a worthwhile practice, but I'd be worried about manifesting some of your masters' voices, that's not always good.

    13 Set 2010 Rispondi
  • Scriabinist

    I always enjoy your analyses. Excellent observations, they'll for sure spark some re-tuning of my ears for future listens of the work. You think you could do that with the fourth symphony? Requiem is to Vastarien as Symphony No. 4 is to Scriabinist, so I needs to know more about it, I needs to. It's odd to me that he's not as popular as Prokofiev or Stravinsky, his music isn't too far out there for most classical listeners to appreciate. Thanks (about the school)-- I'm looking forward to it, sort of. You know Sanjaya from American Idol? He's in my class. Not sure why I'm including that but there you go, I typed it. What do you mean beating others at their own game? Like composing in all styles? Oh, and I'm immersed in the tragic side of Schnittke now which brings me to this here cunty little question: what's the most miserable, hideously depressing piece of classical music you can name?

    29 Ago 2010 Rispondi
  • Scriabinist

    The Requiem is brilliant! It's written in a different style though, each movement sounds like it was conceived in a kind of vague A-B-A form. Almost sounds like satanic pop music. And ha, what's with the beat that comes in during the 13th movement? I also read that a handful of the themes from the Requiem stemmed off of leftover themes from the piano quintet, which is one of my favorite works of his. The plan for now is a composer/performer program at this school in Seattle (starts in September). As for who I'll be studying with, one of these folks: http://www.cornish.edu/music/faculty/ -- but I haven't been told which ones yet. Ahh I have to take chorus. Stab me in the chest, just do it. What are you doing in school now? Writing anything? [PM if you want]

    20 Ago 2010 Rispondi
  • Scriabinist

    Nice picks. 4 & 2 -- the Jesus ones, those are my favorites. After that it goes 8, 3, 6, (9), 7, 1, 5. I'm not big on the whole Shostakovichy spacial thing he did with the last four symphonies, but I think the most successful was with number eight. I was really looking forward to the ninth, I'd heard all these stories and reviews on it and I had this very distinct sound in my head of what it was going to be like -- creepy, out of this world, like the piano quintet or opening of the third violin concerto but in grand symphonic form. To me it represented death (he did write it after spending a little time in the uh, other realm so to say) so I was VERY surprised when I first laid ears upon it. At first I was disappointed, but it grew on me and got me thinking that death, I guess, is something much, much different than what I initially thought. The work is twisted in a more extreme, profound sense. How did you like the ninth?

    8 Ago 2010 Rispondi
  • Scriabinist

    Feinberg was a good example of the modernist composer that slowly moves from modernist composition styles to more tonal periods. Early works hint a strong Scriabin influence, but later ones are twisted in a more bizarre way with lots of baroque references. Look into all 12 of his sonatas. The sixth is the most widely-recognized but all are worth checking out. To me, his works are like more readily-accesible versions of Ustvolskaya & Gubaidulina (whose solo piano music I do not understand). Foss! I'll look into that work. For Kapustin, the third mvt. of the second piano sonata is wonderfully relaxing and slow with allusions to rainy day jazz but still gets a bit funky. ha what got you into Kapustin? Schnittke did things that would - with anyone else- be stupid, but he did them in ways where they're like, demented and fucked up. The book just arrived, am going to go into Schnittke hibernation, study his symphonies and read that book a million times. Get ready for some nerdy conversations

    20 Lug 2010 Rispondi
  • Scriabinist

    Schnittke: “It is an attempt to reconstruct the classical form of the four-movement symphony (with dramatic sonata form, a ‘funfair-scherzo,’ a philosophical Adagio and a liberating finale) - a form which has meanwhile been destroyed by the development of music - from fragments and leftovers, supplying new material where it was missing.” I'm sure you've seen this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ahNSKcnVfE4 but if not, the first few parts document the first symphony and give some insight on the work (Schnittke himself even talks about it...in Russian, with French translations, ha). Also there was this really mesmerizing effect I noticed in the second symphony. The first movement when the strings start, each player plays the same thing but just BARELY behind the player in front of them. It creates this amazing, haunting and sublime effect. What's your favorite symphony of his? Thanks for the analysis-link, I've got a copy of "Vortex" around here somewhere and I'll certainly look into it.

    12 Lug 2010 Rispondi
  • Scriabinist

    Thanks for all the recommendations and links, am going to have to reciprocate big time in the near future. (K)ein Sommernachtstraum is the work where the baroque-esque melody moves into something like a quadrupel canon before completely dissolving into dissonance, right? I'm starting to see why he's your favorite, haha. Feinberg's later piano sonatas employ similar techniques, totally recommended if you haven't heard them. I think the ninth(??) is the one where the melody follows a quiet little d major Bach-like phrase and then spontaneously explodes into the keyboard being violently smashed all around. There's also this electroacoustique composer, Mitterer, whose "Inwendig Losgelös" suite is composed of Baroque samples that gets all glitchy and looped and computerized randomly, it's great. Wow I got sidetracked. Back to Schnittke-- I think I "get" the first symphony now after having listened to it enough and having watched videos of its performance (interesting choreography...)

    12 Lug 2010 Rispondi
  • Scriabinist

    Hahaha what. What. This is insane and brilliant, how have I not heard this before? The brilliance of Désintégrations in terms of symphonic organization with electronic sounds easily exceeds what I previously held as the highest caliber. Diving deep into spectral music sounds like a must at this point. Thanks so much for sharing. Did you ever get a chance to analyze any Murail? Thanks for the recommendaton on the book, just bought a copy. I'll admit I've been lazy with Schnittke's large-scale compositions, I've only just started on his symphonies. Still trying to digest the first before moving on. Incredible work but I'm not sure I understand it yet. It's like an allusion to different periods of music from Western civilization, right? The second movement where the baroque music slowly dissolves into dissonance... incredible!

    2 Lug 2010 Rispondi
  • Scriabinist

    HAPPY BIRTHDAY OR BELATED BIRTHDAY BTW

    28 Giu 2010 Rispondi
  • Scriabinist

    It was either Horowitz or Rachmaninoff who said something like "too many composers are beginning to bring their music out of their brains instead of their hearts." You and Schoenberg should come over sometime, we could totally party and do 12-tone rows together. Both schools of thought are worth exploring, but getting caught up in one and shunning the other will definitely limit you artistically at some point. You always run the risk of repeating yourself, so there's certainly an appeal in opening up a broad spectrum of composition methods. Murail is new to me, send me some if you have any. I don't know anything about Lachenmann, I was hoping you'd suggest something haha. Do you know any good biographies on Schnittke?

    28 Giu 2010 Rispondi
  • Boogalah

    No, no lo he oído :O Pero con esa voz suya que tanto me gusta, es para tenerlo en cuenta! Gracias por la info ^_^

    25 Giu 2010 Rispondi
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