Diario

  • Seederman's Rock and Pop Reprints #11: What are some of your most unpopular music…

    Mar 5 2013, 16:52

    Reposts of some Seederman replies at Yahoo! Answers Rock and Pop section. All questions are in the asker's own words/spellings.

    Note: although I try to answer questions factually, and usually double-check whenever there is a doubt, I'm sure my answers contain mistakes, overgeneralizations, and extreme bias. Don't bug me about arcane corrections, I really don't care. Unless you do it nicely...


    What are some of your most unpopular music opinions?


    What are some of your most unpopular music opinions?


    asked by R. Saldio




    These are mostly unpopular at Yahoo Answers R&P. In other circles, people understand where I'm coming from. However, I will always stand by my convictions, which are:

    "Stairway to Heaven" is one of the worst songs ever.
    Queen is campy and bombastic.
    There is no such thing as a hipster.
    There really is such a thing as taste.
    The Beatles were okay, but their fans are thick and ordinary.
    Radiohead went downhill after Pablo Honey.
    Billy Joel is cringeworthy most of the time.
    Brian Jonestown Massacre was the most important band of the 1990's.
    2007-2013 has been one of the best eras ever for rock music
    80% of the best albums of the last 30 years were released on indie labels
    The Sex Pistols were excellent musicians.
    Vinyl really doesn't sound better than digital.
    The 70's had just as much utter, barf inducing crapola on the charts as the 10's do.
    Punk pop was actually a good genre until the mid 80's or so.
    Sting is a pompous a ss.
    Rush was barely good for two decent songs per album, if that.
    Jimmy Page has done nothing musical in over 30 years, if not longer.
    The Fugs, Captain Beefheart, and Pere Ubu should be in the Rock and Roll Hall of fame, and 75% of its members kicked out.
    Australia has produced more good rock groups than anywhere else in the last few years.
    Dubstep has its moments.
    Synthesizers are not evil.
    Bob Dylan has a wonderful voice (or at least, had)
    Journey is utter corporate schlock.
    You don't have to be stoned to listen to the Grateful Dead.
    All Time Low fans constantly need to be told what to listen to.
    The best rock of the 21st century will come largely from non-English speaking countries.
    There is absolutely no legitimate use for a keytar.
    You either tolerate Morrissey or you don't.
    The entire Britpop movement of the 90's was a snooze.
    Classic rock radio is the most boring radio format of all.
    There's nothing wrong with tagging subgenres into your mp3 collection if you want to.
    No concert ticket is ever worth more than 20 bucks, no matter who it is.
    Rock music receives just as much studio processing as pop music does.
    Generation Y has got to be the laziest generation ever when it comes to finding music.
    80% of all music listeners cease expanding their musical horizons by their mid-30's, and stick to the same stuff forever more.
    It's hard to see why a male would listen to Bon Jovi.
    Guns 'n' Roses was pure junk.
    Shoegaze produced more good albums in the 90's than any other subgenre.
    The Who's best work was pre-Tommy.
    Michael Jackson was a marionette.
    Jim Morrison did more to give poetry a bad name than any other figure in the 20th century.
    Post-grunge is just as crass and phony as the shiniest pop star.
    Grunge wasn't all that hot either, when you get right down to it.
    Jimi Hendrix deserves his legend.
    The Velvet Underground has influenced more groups than the Beatles.
    Enya is for timid NPR listeners looking for some "culture"
    The best hip hop is as compelling, intelligent, sonically pleasing as the best rock.
    People need to get out of musical ruts more often.
    There's no such thing as a "greatest" anything.
    Ozzy Osbourne, lovable though he is, really did have a trashy solo career.
    Woodstock really is a pretty boring movie.
    The Last Waltz revealed The Band to be absolute morons as much as gifted musicians.
    Sometimes you really can tell what somebody's like by what they listen to.
    Technology always adds to music's overall palette, and is thus a positive thing.
    All decades are of roughly equal value, musically.
    Japanese noise rock is the best in the world.
    All but a dozen or so famous musical names of the 1960's won't be remembered by the general public by the 2060's.
    R.E.M. pretty much deteriorated album by album ever since "Document"
    Nick Cave should have been more well-known.
    Spontaneity beats technique in rock music.
    Bands with logos have a 240% greater chance of sucking than bands without.
  • Seederman's Rock and Pop Reprints #10: When did rock lose the country aspect of…

    Mar 5 2013, 16:46

    Reposts of some Seederman replies at Yahoo! Answers Rock and Pop section. All questions are in the asker's own words/spellings.

    Note: although I try to answer questions factually, and usually double-check whenever there is a doubt, I'm sure my answers contain mistakes, overgeneralizations, and extreme bias. Don't bug me about arcane corrections, I really don't care. Unless you do it nicely...



    When did rock lose the country aspect of early rockabilly?

    Looking back at things, it seems like rock can be traced back to rockabilly which has some mix of blues with country of the time.

    But then looking at many of the 60s rock bands, there's very little country to be found and much more emphasis on blues licks. So when did it transition from blues/country influenced rockabilly bands to the blue influenced blues-rock/hard rock/psychadelica?


    Asked by THEE MISTER PANCAKE O



    It only really became scarce in the early 1960's to mid 1960's, when it was crowded out by the British Invasion, Motown, and Folk Rock. However, some rockabilly turned up in British music, including stuff by the Beatles. By the late 70's rockabilly had again become a major component of some rock music, if no longer mainstream.

    Country rock was reinvented in 1967-1969, in the work of Buffalo Springfield, The Byrds, Gram Parsons, Flying Burrito Brothers, Bob Dylan, Poco, et. al. This country-rock wasn't rockabilly; it was more of a Bakersfield-style country influence. But it did reintroduce country music into rock's DNA. Rick Nelson had some success with rockabilly during this time.

    Rockabilly returned in the late 70's. Robert Gordon was an important rockabilly revivalist, and also worked with Link Wray on some key records at the time. Dave Edmunds and Nick Lowe's sound was largely based on it. Country crossover acts like Eddie Rabbitt got rock airplay with an updated rockabilly sound. The Stray Cats scored big hits in the early 80's with straight-faced rockabilly. The Blasters incorporated elements of it. Even Tom Petty has dabbled in it.

    Rockabilly also was a major component of what is now called "psychobilly", which is a punk hybrid with rockabilly. X, The Cramps, The Meteors, The Gun Club, and The Dead Kennedys often employed rockabilly rhythms and guitar in their songs, to name just a handful. Psychobilly has existed ever since, enjoying a second heyday in the mid 1990's.

    So, it's still in there. 1960-1963 mostly saw a concerted effort to 'clean up' the radio, and rock 'n' roll lost a lot of its chart power in favor of soft pop ballads, so that was when rockabilly's influence began to ebb. The mid 60's groups knocked it off the charts almost entirely. But it has proved to be a sturdy influence, and one of the bigger parts of rock's DNA.
  • Seederman's Rock and Pop Reprints #9: Why do people consider AC/DC to be metal, when…

    Ott 13 2012, 1:07

    Seederman is very loathe to admit this, but he answers music related questions (usually, but not always) posed by teenagers at Yahoo! Answers. I'm one of a handful of people there who sometimes put thought into an answer (other times, I am an arrogant, loud, opinionated bully, but it is for their own good...) I hate wasting them, so I'll repost some of my favorites here. The question, which will be in quotes, will always be in the asker's own words and spellings.

    Note: although I try to answer questions correctly, and usually double-check whenever there is a doubt, I'm sure my answers are full of mistakes. Don't bug me about corrections, I really don't care. Unless you do it nicely...


    Seederman's Rock and Pop Reprints #9: Why do people consider AC/DC to be metal, when it's actually not?

    Why do people consider AC/DC to be metal, when it's actually not? I mean, they're not really heavy or aggressive enough to be considered metal, if anything they're hard/blues rock, which is close to metal, but not *quite* there. People often forget that loud guitars =/= metal. Hardcore punk often has loud guitars, industrial music often has loud guitars, and even traditional rock music can have loud guitars, but none of these genres on their own are forms of metal, unless they're combined with metal.

    asked by weemanextreeme




    Because in 1977 they were heavy metal. So were Led Zeppelin, Alice Cooper, Grand Funk Railroad, Queen, Blue Oyster Cult, Kiss, Ted Nugent, and Uriah Heep, none of whom would be considered heavy metal now.

    The phrase heavy metal was coined by Steppenwolf in "Born to Be Wild" in 1968, and Lester Bangs was the first rock critic to use the term to describe the genre in 1971, in an article for Creem magazine. Creem was an early champion of heavy metal in the 1970's, and promoted all of the aforementioned bands.

    Anyone alive in the 1970's referred to those bands as heavy metal at the time. It wasn't until the New Wave of British Metal, and the speed/thrash metal years that heavy metal was redefined to mean groups that had something in common with Judas Priest, Venom, or Metallica/Megadeth, and the earlier groups no longer qualified. The term "Heavy" generally was dropped after that, and became just "Metal"

    When you say AC/DC isn't heavy metal, you are applying the definition of "metal" retroactively, and changing what those bands once were.

    Which is fine, the new designation probably is better than the old one, AC/DC and Led Zeppelin have more in common with the Faces and Bad Company than they do with Metallica or Megadeth.

    But this is the reason why. Older people who remember the 70's tend to be more resistant to retroactive genre tagging, because it interferes with very deeply ingrained memories. Younger people who do it are not off base; it is from those aforementioned bands that later metal developed.

    But you don't have to call them metal or heavy metal if you don't want to; how you tag your files is entirely up to you.
  • Seederman's Rock and Pop Reprints #8: What Sets Jimi Hendrix Apart from Other Great…

    Ago 31 2012, 14:56

    Seederman is very loathe to admit this, but he answers music related questions (usually, but not always) posed by teenagers at Yahoo! Answers. I'm one of a handful of people there who sometimes put thought into an answer (other times, I am an arrogant, loud, opinionated bully, but it is for their own good...) I hate wasting them, so I'll repost some of my favorites here. The question, which will be in quotes, will always be in the asker's own words and spellings.

    Note: although I try to answer questions correctly, and usually double-check whenever there is a doubt, I'm sure my answers are full of mistakes. Don't bug me about corrections, I really don't care. Unless you do it nicely...


    Seederman's Rock and Pop Reprints #8: What Sets Jimi Hendrix Apart from Other Great Guitarists?

    What sets Jimi Hendrix apart from other great guitarists?

    asked by Hedgehog



    The immediate and far reaching impact he had on rock music, and even jazz.

    You have to imagine the setting when he had appeared. He had quietly honed his chops in a series of rhythm and blues bands that flew completely under rock's radar in the mid-60's. Rock, circa 1966, was a fairly timid and tuneful place. The British Invasion had started dying out, gentle folk-rock like The Byrds was in, the psychedelic scene in San Francisco hadn't yet broken nationally, and most people still thought of rock music as "teen" music, but that was on the cusp of changing.

    Then, you have to imagine him when he appeared for the first time on the national stage at Monterey Pop. Nobody had ever heard of this guy, and he comes out with his guitar, and in between screwing it, burning it, and smashing it to pieces he unleashed a voodoo brew of psychedelic soulified "hard rock" before anyone had really conceived of the term. He blew everyone's minds, as they used to say in those days, in a flash. A whole new vocabulary for rock music unfolded on the Monterey Pop stage that day that nobody, literally nobody, had conceived of before (and it took decades to catch up to him)

    Then, you have to consider his influence. Pete Townshend has said in interviews that he became buddies with Eric Clapton, whom he had never been especially chummy with, within days of Hendrix's debut in England. Townshend said that Hendrix scared them both with his brilliance; they suddenly felt like they had been instantly rendered old and obsolete. Both immediately upped their own playing in response, pushing themselves far further than they had ever before. Every major guitarist active at the time was instantly transformed. Jimmy Page and Jeff Beck were never the same again either, and many others. Hendrix had opened up a galaxy of new ideas.

    Certainly his image as a black ex-paratrooper from Seattle set him apart from other guitarists too.

    Hendrix was also one of the very very few rock musicians to gain respect in the jazz world, despite the fact that he didn't play jazz. His method of improvisation appealed to jazz sensibilities; Miles Davis was known for dissing most rock stars as "non-playing mf's", reserving praise for only two: Jerry Garcia and Jimi Hendrix (with whom he was rumored to have been considering recording, at the time Hendrix died)

    Hendrix' contribution to the ultimate sound, shape, and image rock and roll took for much of the next decade was as large as any other rock group you can name, as important as the Beatles, the Velvets, The Stones, Dylan...

    Hendrix also evolved fast; in 3 short years of activity, he had gone from psychedelia to hard rock to funk and his death (he didn't use heroin btw, contrary to popular belief) was one of the most tragic in rock history, because probably nobody has died with so much unrealized potential, except maybe Buddy Holly.

    A lot of uninformed people dis him for a variety of reasons: they say he wasn't "technical" (to which I say, thank god he wasn't), they say he was limited (yeah, sure...) they say he couldn't sing (he sang just fine, he had a voice full of character and could storytell too. A fine songwriter, too) All that does is demonstrate a lack of understanding of just what Hendrix accomplished.

    He's earned his distinction as a giant in rock history. And the fact that 3 generations have found value in his music (which only a limited number of rock artists ever achieve) despite his releasing a mere four albums in his lifetime, shows that Hendrix will endure through time.
  • Seederman's Rock and Pop Reprints #7: Did the Rolling Stones Start the Blues and…

    Ago 31 2012, 4:17

    Seederman is very loathe to admit this, but he answers music related questions (usually, but not always) posed by teenagers at Yahoo! Answers. I'm one of a handful of people there who sometimes put thought into an answer (other times, I am an arrogant, loud, opinionated bully, but it is for their own good...) I hate wasting them, so I'll repost some of my favorites here. The question, which will be in quotes, will always be in the asker's own words and spellings.

    Note: although I try to answer questions correctly, and usually double-check whenever there is a doubt, I'm sure my answers are full of mistakes. Don't bug me about corrections, I really don't care. Unless you do it nicely...


    Seederman's Rock and Pop Reprints #7: Did the Rolling Stones Start the Blues and Goth Movement in Rock n Roll?

    Did the rolling stones start the blues and goth movement in rock n roll?

    i was having a conversation with someone on youtube yesterday while watching a rolling stones video and according to this person the stones are responsible for both the blues and goth movement in rock n roll.

    i've always thought zeppelin and the doors started the blues movement and sabbath was responsible for the goth movement but apparently not


    asked by Last



    Man, I would have loved to be a fly on the wall during that conversation. So much misinformation, flowing back and forth.

    1. There never was a "blues movement" in rock. There was/is a such thing as "blues rock", but blues is an entirely different music form.

    2. The Rolling Stones were neither "blues" nor "blues rock". They started as a R&B group. They were central to helping define rock music's form in the 60's, but they sure weren't goth.

    3. The Doors, who began life 4 years later than the Stones were not a blues band. They were a psychedelic band with some blues-rock elements. They helped inspire some later musicians like Patti Smith, but that isn't blues either. Morrison's vocal delivery was later used by some goth rock bands in the 80's, but the Doors themselves were not goth.

    4. Led Zeppelin was called "heavy metal" when they were new, although in retrospect, people call them "hard rock" now. They borrowed, usually shamelessly, from the blues. But they weren't blues, and absolutely weren't goth.

    5. Black Sabbath was heavy metal too. I wouldn't call them goth either, except that their album covers and songs sometimes depicted death.

    6. Goth music didn't really appear until 15 years later, in the late 70's and early 80's. I'd credit Siouxsie and the Banshees with being an early pioneer. The Birthday Party and Killing Joke were some other early ones. Bauhaus, who debuted in 1979, gets my vote as the first "real" goth rock group.
  • Seederman's Rock and Pop Reprints #6: Why Did Lou Reed and Doug Yule Hate Each Other…

    Ago 29 2012, 7:34

    Seederman is very loathe to admit this, but he answers music related questions (usually, but not always) posed by teenagers at Yahoo! Answers. I'm one of a handful of people there who sometimes put thought into an answer (other times, I am an arrogant, loud, opinionated bully, but it is for their own good...) I hate wasting them, so I'll repost some of my favorites here. The question, which will be in quotes, will always be in the asker's own words and spellings.

    Note: although I try to answer questions correctly, and usually double-check whenever there is a doubt, I'm sure my answers are full of mistakes. Don't bug me about corrections, I really don't care. Unless you do it nicely...


    Seederman's Rock and Pop Reprints #6: Why Did Lou Reed and Doug Yule Hate Each Other after the VU?

    Why did Lou Reed and Doug Yule hate each other after the VU?

    asked by Shadowplay



    Well, first off, they don't really "hate" each other. Doug Yule plays on a pair of Lou's mid-70's solo albums (Sally Can't Dance and Coney Island Baby).

    The story of Doug is he was brought in after John Cale left, stuck around for a live album and "Loaded", in 1969-1970. Then Reed left the VU, but the VU continued on with Yule, Sterling Morrison, and Mo Tucker through most of 1971. Morrison eventually quit, and Tucker was kinda pushed out by the manager. The beef is that Yule (and his manager) assembled a new VU from session players, and toured Europe with it in 1972. Then, the session players all got fired and a new band got assembled from other session players around Yule in 1973, which released a new Velvet Underground album ("Squeeze", 1973) Most of the instruments on the album were played by Yule, who wrote and sang everything, with little session help.

    A lot of VU fans get annoyed with Yule for being involved with "Squeeze", an album that everyone hates, and which has never seen a CD release in the US. (It really isn't so bad actually, kind of a poor-man's "Loaded". Yule had co-written most of the songs on "Loaded" and sang three of Reed's songs on it, so "Squeeze" really isn't that much of a departure.) Calling it "Velvet Underground" is what rankles most people.

    However, Reed didn't seem to hold it against him so much, since the very next year he invited him to work with him. A lot of what happened with "Squeeze" was beyond Yule's control; many forces were behind it.
  • Seederman's Rock and Pop Reprints #5: Why Don't Boybands Last Long?

    Ago 29 2012, 6:50

    Seederman is very loathe to admit this, but he answers music related questions (usually, but not always) posed by teenagers at Yahoo! Answers. I'm one of a handful of people there who sometimes put thought into an answer (other times, I am an arrogant, loud, opinionated bully, but it is for their own good...) I hate wasting them, so I'll repost some of my favorites here. The question, which will be in quotes, will always be in the asker's own words and spellings.

    Note: although I try to answer questions correctly, and usually double-check whenever there is a doubt, I'm sure my answers are full of mistakes. Don't bug me about corrections, I really don't care. Unless you do it nicely...


    Seederman's Rock and Pop Reprints #5: Why Don't Boybands last long?

    Why boybands don't last long?

    Why boybands dont last long?
    N'SYNC break up at early 00s
    Backstreet Boys didn't break up yet but they are not popular anymore.Allot of people didn't even hear about them nowadays.
    Around 2008 Jonas Brothers are popular boyband but nowadays they are not that popular
    Three previous boybands fade away so fast
    And now we have One Direction i think they will also fade away after few years.
    Why boybands dont last long?


    asked by Coco



    1. They usually can't write songs
    2. They usually can't play instruments
    3. They aren't "cute" anymore after they turn 19 or so...
    4. Record sales start to fall
    5. The manager moves on to his next project, and starts ignoring them
    6. Their kiddie fanbase discovers more adult music
    7. They are assembled by a manager, they weren't friends who came together on their own
    8. Wives and girlfriends, the same old story...
    9. They are associated with a particular "sound" that falls out of style after a couple years
    10. Drugs and drink

    By the way, the Backstreet Boys broke up in the early 00's. They have since reunited, but minus a member.
  • Seederman's Rock and Pop Reprints #4: What Was the First Synthesizer and What Year…

    Ago 29 2012, 6:45

    Seederman is very loathe to admit this, but he answers music related questions (usually, but not always) posed by teenagers at Yahoo! Answers. I'm one of a handful of people there who sometimes put thought into an answer (other times, I am an arrogant, loud, opinionated bully, but it is for their own good...) I hate wasting them, so I'll repost some of my favorites here. The question, which will be in quotes, will always be in the asker's own words and spellings.

    Note: although I try to answer questions correctly, and usually double-check whenever there is a doubt, I'm sure my answers are full of mistakes. Don't bug me about corrections, I really don't care. Unless you do it nicely...


    Seederman's Rock and Pop Reprints #4: What Was the First Synthesizer and What Year Was It Used?

    What was the first synthesizer and what year was it used?

    A Synthesizer is an electronic music instrument which has oscillators and provides music through imitation


    asked by Paul



    It depends how strictly you want to stick to that definition. Electronic music began after a series of inventions in the 1910's-1920's, although none of those instruments were truly synthesizers.

    One possible vote can go to the RCA Electronic Music Synthesizer (produced 1951-1952) but it didn't exactly synthesize sounds, it relied on prerecorded tapes. It was followed by by the RCA Mark II Sound Synthesizer in 1957, which was programmable.

    The modular synthesizer dates to Harald Bode and his instruments of 1959-1960.

    The first commercially available Moog synthesizer went on sale (at prices so high only the very rich could afford them) in 1965, and probably would count as the first modern synthesizer.

    An interesting trivia note is that the first rock band to include a synthesizer on a rock record were the Monkees, who used a Moog in 1966 on the song "Star Collector"

    The Moog Modular Synthesizer (produced 1963-1980), which is what the Monkees and a lot of (rich) 60's groups used, probably deserves credit as the first real synthesizer. The Rolling Stones used it in 1967 on Their Satanic Majesties Request, and the Beatles used it on Abbey Road.
  • Seederman's Rock and Pop Reprints #3: Were The Grateful Dead Mostly a Covers Band?

    Ago 29 2012, 6:37

    Seederman is very loathe to admit this, but he answers music related questions (usually, but not always) posed by teenagers at Yahoo! Answers. I'm one of a handful of people there who sometimes put thought into an answer (other times, I am an arrogant, loud, opinionated bully, but it is for their own good...) I hate wasting them, so I'll repost some of my favorites here. The question, which will be in quotes, will always be in the asker's own words and spellings.

    Note: although I try to answer questions correctly, and usually double-check whenever there is a doubt, I'm sure my answers are full of mistakes. Don't bug me about corrections, I really don't care. Unless you do it nicely...


    Seederman's Rock and Pop Reprints #3: Were The Grateful Dead Mostly a Covers Band?

    How many songs that the Grateful Dead sang, did they actually write?

    They were mostly a cover band, correct?


    asked by Josephine



    Incorrect.

    Most of their studio albums were written by two songwriting teams: Jerry Garcia & Robert Hunter (one of the best lyricists in American history), and Bob Weir & John Perry Barlow. Phil Lesh, Brent Mydland and Pigpen also contributed songs here and there.

    The following albums have no cover versions:

    Anthem of the Sun
    Aoxomoxoa
    Workingman's Dead
    American Beauty
    Wake of the Flood
    From the Mars Hotel
    Blues for Allah
    Go To Heaven
    In The Dark
    Built to Last

    Most of the cover versions they did were in live shows (they have released over 100 live albums, mostly posthumously). They also would sprinkle one or two covers into some of their studio albums, usually when they were running low on fresh new songs. However, many of their cover versions were legendary, as a Deadhead might put it, when they turned up in the right place in a set.
  • Seederman's Rock and Pop Reprints #2: Why Did So Many Black People Lose Interest in…

    Ago 29 2012, 6:29

    Seederman is very loathe to admit this, but he answers music related questions (usually, but not always) posed by teenagers at Yahoo! Answers. I'm one of a handful of people there who sometimes put thought into an answer (other times, I am an arrogant, loud, opinionated bully, but it is for their own good...) I hate wasting them, so I'll repost some of my favorites here. The question, which will be in quotes, will always be in the asker's own words and spellings.

    Note: although I try to answer questions correctly, and usually double-check whenever there is a doubt, I'm sure my answers are full of mistakes. Don't bug me about corrections, I really don't care. Unless you do it nicely...


    Seederman's Rock and Pop Reprints #2: Why Did So Many Black People Lose Interest in Rock n Roll?

    Why did so many black people lose interest in rock n roll?

    Black musicians like Chuck Berry and Little Richard had such a huge role in defining the early style, and then all of a sudden, it became "white music" (not entirely accurate i know, since its popular all over the world, but still) What happened?


    asked by ?



    Radio stations were still mostly segregated in the US in the 1950's. White stations refused to play black rock and roll records. Instead, white guys like the Crew Cuts and Pat Boone covered black records, sanded off the edges to make them less threatening, and got played on white radio instead.

    Naturally, the original rock and rollers saw no point to keep going when they couldn't get their records played, so they stuck to rhythm and blues and black radio.