Diario

  • Review of Patrick Wolf's The Bachelor

    Ago 4 2009, 15:37

    If there was an underground-electro district of Diagon Alley (of Harry Potter fame), then Patrick Wolf would certainly be the headliner every night.
    The Bachelor is Wolf's fourth album and he continues on his streak of conjuring worlds of dark magic and quenched dreams but yet in the way that only a wizard can, leaves you feeling as if the quest for the Philosopher's Stone will just be a walk in the park.
    Tilda Swinton plays the role of The Voice of Hope on 'Oblivion', 'Thickets' and 'Theseus' which proves that as a concept album, a political concept album at that (see 'Count Of Casualty'), The Bachelor does not adhere to the ordinary to make a point.
    There are tender moments on the album as songs like 'Blackdown' and 'The Sun Is Often Out' will stop you in your tracks so you can absorb what is being said.
    With belters like the madcap 'Battles' and 'Vulture', he sticks to the feel-good reliables of raised voices, easy-to-remember hook lines and swelling strings. But you can easily forgive that as you are dragged down to the dregs of the wizarding society as you're tapping your feet and wands and dancing like Ziggy Stardust, Billy Idol, Kate Bush and J.R.R Tolkien had an orgy and that orgy manifested in the wonder that is Patrick Wolf.
  • He knows what he wants to know - David Kitt

    Apr 17 2009, 0:25

    Interview with David Kitt 3 April

    David Kitt is a man of many words. These sporadic and sometimes mumbled words can often form a sentence but they are more are just a unconscious stream of thought. With the release of his latest album The Nightsaver last month, he tracks how he and his music style has changed and shifted since the beginning of his career.
    "I've gone back and forth, to the left, to the right, gone to a different country, gone on holidays...It's pretty close to where it came from and it's in the sweet stage at the moment. It just keeps coming." He has a positive take on the new album and says that it is the only one of his that he can still listen to now that it is complete. This pride can be owed to his more exploratory approach to music that he has taken on.
    "I'm full of ideas now and my computer is filling up with music. I'm very productive at the moment and want to feel inside the music," he says. "I'm going through the motions and I'm trying not to get too lost in it. I've just have to be a passenger to the music and feel connected."
    Since the release of his first album Small Moments in 2000, a lot has changed with music in Ireland. "I've never understood the connection to those singer/songwriters. I've always dabbled in everything, not just picking up a guitar. I've evolved but I don't think with people's taste," he says as he shakes off any comparison to the likes of The Frames and Mark Geary. He notes that he feels more in tune with what bands are doing now than ever before. "I get what the new kids are doing now. I see these 21, 22 year olds and I feel connected to what they're doing musically and not to the old lads. It feels fresh."
    He honestly reflects on the transition that his career has made and is aware that the good times will drive alongside the bad times. In 2003, Kitt and his band had the chance to fill in for The White Stripes when they pulled out of the Witnness Festival in Punchestown. They played to over 10, 000 people. However, that same year they were playing support to "some guy from You're A Star" in Cashel and they knew that it just wasn't working. "Everyday has its highs and lows. There's always something to bring you back down to earth but very few people need to be brought back down to earth unless you're Damien Rice or somebody who earns loads of money like that."
    When asked if he could change absolutely anything in the world, Kitt's answer indicates that he still has a few obstacles to tackle. "There doesn't seem to be any real imagination in the mainstream. Everything has been dumbed down to the lowest common denominator. Mediocre music by mediocre people. The talent is there. You can see it in advertising and computer games but I'd love to see the pop world be turned on its head."
    With six albums already under his belt and a touring schedule that sees him hit Whelans on 18 April, Kitt doesn't seem to be slowing down at any rate.


    Review of The Nightsaver from 15 March
    Reliability and consistency are qualities that one searches for in a friend or a good pub. Some musicians offer this pined-for quality and it is a comfort to their fans. But lately the music scene has seen a sudden shift. The charts are overrun with bright young things and the bearded men with guitars are lagging behind on the Last Played List on many an iTunes account.
    David Kitt, however, has made the effort to keep up with the changing trend and made an applaudable attempt. His sixth LP, The Nightsaver, has kept its trademark Kitt sound but in comparison to his back-catalogue, it won't further his career any farther than it is now.
    His name will always be included as one of the greats from the period where Ireland dished out more singer-songwriters than packets of cheese and onion Tayto. To have secured longevity or an extended fanbase, he needed to churn out a remarkable album and not just a remarkable Kitt album. As he ventures out into new territories in terms of style of music with Nightsaver, there should be a notable difference from his previous work.
    With the increased use of synthesizers and soundbites, Nightsaver is an inoffensive album. While those who have followed Kitt's career will be happy with the familiarity of his sound, others will find that it blends into the background. It takes a little while to kick off but by the fifth track, Alone Like That, it reemerges from the background and Kitt finally makes his presence felt.
    Maybe this recognition by track five is the reliability that one seeks and by the last track, No Truth In Your Eyes, you are left humming the tune for the rest of the day and welcome the return of an old sound.
  • Dublin Venues Retain Their Charm

    Feb 22 2009, 15:25

    Of all the venues in all the world, you had to rock this one. Dublin city is beriddled, not just with rats and one-legged pigeons, but with music venues that have the potential to charm the pants off audiences and bands alike.
    One such venue is The Olympia Theatre. Built in 1879, it is one of the more elaborate venues with a golden touch denoted to everything but it also allows intimacy with the capacity for 1,300 people. This built-in intimacy in such refined settings made Michael Stipe of Rem take notice and chose the Olympia to test out live performances of their 2007 album Accelerate.
    For Irish bands, Whelans is generally the venue of choice to engage their home audience before they break onto bigger venues with bigger ticket prices like the Ambassador or The Point/O2. Built in the grottier times of 1772, the woody texture and pint-soaked aroma of Whelans has hosted and adopted Irish bands from each genre of music. Its hey day was when the place was overrun with the singer-songwriter gang (Damien Rice, The Frames, Paddy Casey, Damien Dempsey) as they went for their daily pint. It had the honour of showcasing the Arctic Monkeys in their early days before they exploded and when their tickets cost €15. Today, thanks to the Phantom run night Phantasm, members of younger Irish bands are often spotted socialising, DJing and launching their EPs there.
    The large, open space of the Ambassador hosts most of the metal/hardcore bands compared to any of the other venues. Trivium, Megadeth, Killswitch Engage as well as Kaiser Chiefs, Vitalic and Queens of the Stone Age have all played in its halls that feel like a deep-pit. However, the Ambassador shall be shortly closing its doors to rock and roll and shall be opening it to the books that were once held in the Ilac Shopping Centre Library. As one of Dublin's most popular venues, it will be sorely missed and difficult to replace.
    The POD complex of Tripod and Crawdaddy is one of the more recent venues and has had some eclectic acts including Coolio, Boys II Men, Jape, Villagers, Dan Le Sac vs Scroobius Pip which have all been packed like Christmas Eve Mass. Tripod holds the bigger acts that have already established their fanbase, whereas Crawdaddy is a cosy venue that gives the artist the chance to win you over.
    There is an immediate atmosphere in these venues where the history is written on the walls and the songs echo through the halls. They have survived the changing image of rock music and all that they require from us is to keep coming as each bead of our sweat becomes woven into their story.
  • Dublin Venues Retain Their Charm

    Feb 22 2009, 15:24

    Of all the venues in all the world, you had to rock this one. Dublin city is beriddled, not just with rats and one-legged pigeons, but with music venues that have the potential to charm the pants off audiences and bands alike.
    One such venue is The Olympia Theatre. Built in 1879, it is one of the more elaborate venues with a golden touch denoted to everything but it also allows intimacy with the capacity for 1,300 people. This built-in intimacy in such refined settings made Michael Stipe of Rem take notice and chose the Olympia to test out live performances of their 2007 album Accelerate.
    For Irish bands, Whelans is generally the venue of choice to engage their home audience before they break onto bigger venues with bigger ticket prices like the Ambassador or The Point/O2. Built in the grottier times of 1772, the woody texture and pint-soaked aroma of Whelans has hosted and adopted Irish bands from each genre of music. Its hey day was when the place was overrun with the singer-songwriter gang (Damien Rice, The Frames, Paddy Casey, Damien Dempsey) as they went for their daily pint. It had the honour of showcasing the Arctic Monkeys in their early days before they exploded and when their tickets cost €15. Today, thanks to the Phantom run night Phantasm, members of younger Irish bands are often spotted socialising, DJing and launching their EPs there.
    The large, open space of the Ambassador hosts most of the metal/hardcore bands compared to any of the other venues. Trivium, Megadeth, Killswitch Engage as well as Kaiser Chiefs, Vitalic and Queens of the Stone Age have all played in its halls that feel like a deep-pit. However, the Ambassador shall be shortly closing its doors to rock and roll and shall be opening it to the books that were once held in the Ilac Shopping Centre Library. As one of Dublin's most popular venues, it will be sorely missed and difficult to replace.
    The POD complex of Tripod and Crawdaddy is one of the more recent venues and has had some eclectic acts including Coolio, Boys II Men, Jape, Villagers, Dan Le Sac vs Scroobius Pip which have all been packed like Christmas Eve Mass. Tripod holds the bigger acts that have already established their fanbase, whereas Crawdaddy is a cosy venue that gives the artist the chance to win you over.
    There is an immediate atmosphere in these venues where the history is written on the walls and the songs echo through the halls. They have survived the changing image of rock music and all that they require from us is to keep coming as each bead of our sweat becomes woven into their story.
  • Make sure this Village doesn't become a city

    Feb 22 2009, 15:18

    Sat 21 Feb – Villagers

    The interest in Villagers can be benchmarked by the various members of the Dublin music scene that attended the gig in Crawdaddy that was packed like Christmas Eve Mass.
    Former member of The Immediate, Conor O'Brien has delivered to us, the curious public, an engagingly dark and romantic music project. Not only does it mark the sheer talent that exists in the world but it also reminds us that there is still some spark and individuality left in Dublin.
    Every song makes you say "oh hello" and take notice, particularly his finishing song 'Pieces'. There were utterings that Villagers could be the new Frames which is a danger-zone that they should avoid in this test and trial period. There is a similar pattern to both bands songs wherein they begin on a calm note but build up into a swell of emotion and a loud climax.
    However, O'Brien's lyrics are more complex but he ensures that they are not lost on the audience. The EPs were completely sold out within 10 minutes of the show's ending and the foyer was filled with people left discussing what they had just been a part of.
    Villagers is a clear demonstration of undeniable talent and beautiful music but their real challenge is to survive without losing any of the freshness that they have initially brought with them.
  • Book to film adaptations - My top 5

    Feb 12 2009, 20:40

    Anthony Burgess' book A ClockWork Orange brings you to a new society with its own rules, its own language and its own identity. Reading the book, you create your own world for the droogs to roam but Stanley Kubrick's film adaptation illustrates the ultraviolence in such a graphic way that it will shake up whatever Clockwork Orange world you knew before.

    JRR Tolkien's Lord of the Rings trilogy was in no doubt a masterpiece but Peter Jackson's films were an homage to the books. The films could never truly capture the magic of the Middle-Earth but the awe factor is always intact especially during the extravagant battle of Helm's Deep and the sheer and utter hairiness of the hobbits.

    Fight Club as a novel and a film manages to keep you on your toes until the very end. A story of schizophrenia and chaos, the book unhinges something in your own head as you create your own conclusions. However, the stellar performances from Brad Pitt and Edward Norton in David Fincher's film version caught the attention of legions of other fans.

    Ian McEwan's Atonement is a love story propelled by fear and captured by using lyrical language. The film released last year with Keira Knightly transported the beauty of the words into a visual feast of indulgent landscapes and costumes. The cast was picked to perfection with Irish actress Saoirse Ronan as Briony earning an Oscar nomination.

    Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland and Through The Looking Glass bring us to a land so far removed from ours that it could only be translated into picture with the creative team of Disney. It is only in cartoons that you can run complete riot with colours, characters and constant chatter without being accused of a fondness of narcotics.
  • The streets call out your name

    Feb 12 2009, 20:38

    It is everywhere. From the desk you sit at in lectures to the streets that you pass every day from getting from destination A to destination B. Graffiti can be seen as vandalism or it can be seen as art that goes beyond the regular canvas.
    In Dublin alone, graffiti artists vary in style and range. Once you are aware of it, you will find it difficult to go a day without seeing a unique stencil or tag (a tag is the graffiti artist’s personal signature). The most commercial of Dublin’s street artists is Maser. He uses the line ‘Maser Loves You’ and spreads it across shop fronts on George’s Street, outside the Bernard Shaw pub on South Richmond Street and many other locations. The ongoing use of his name and style means instant recognition for his creation much like the infamous Grift who has tagged buildings, bridges,towers and anything that can be accessed at all across the county.
    However, recognition is not what Dublin’s own Dr. Gone wants from his art. "I simply enjoy the act of painting. There is no way to explain the feeling when you paint the freshest piece or got the slickest spot. I don't care if people see it or tell me if it is good or a fresh spot. I like to know that they wish they had done it themselves". He pursues this art as a sport and stands his ground that his technique, as opposed to stenciling, is the truer form of stenciling. "Stenciling is a cop out. Every graffiti writer is furious that they have managed to cling onto what has taken over two decades of blood, tears, lives and jail time for a lot of us and to be accepted."
    Lampsy takes a more light-hearted approach to his art. He uses his 'I Love Lamp' logo to brighten up people's days and to share the love of the lamp. His posters and stickers of lamps in every shape and form are found all across the city centre and are an ode to that line, yes that line, in Anchorman. Other Dublin stencilers include Asbestos. His 'Lost Series' of posters advertise missing items like cardboard boxes and slices of toast. The posters are rare gems to come across but even rarer are his dolls' heads. They can be all found on his website www.theartofasbestos.com but to find them in the real world is a tougher quest.
    It is clear that there are many talented artists working on the streets in Dublin but as it stands, there is no one particular outlet to exhibit it. When asked about the City Council’s attitude towards street art, Dr. Gone dismisses their attempts at making art accessible as a waste of money. "Dublin corporations have done very little to develop its truly talented artists. It has dumped money into black holes, instead of doing something about the ever increasing crime as a pastime. I've seen these projects drain tens of thousands of Euro and all you get is the kids drawing all over it and burning it. It's very frustrating."
    For many, the line between art and vandalism is a thin one. Dr. Gone argues that vandalism is a question of ownership. Brian Kelly, an artist from the USA who studied Fine Arts in the Burren College of Art in Co.Clare, feels the same. "I enjoy vandalism. I think that is part of the thrill of painting the stencil. But I think it is my right to mark the objects around myself", he says. "Corporations have money, so it is okay that they do this. Individuals without money are not allowed to use the streets as communication when it is the neighborhood that we live in and not the corporation's."
    Kelly displays his art on the streets as a way to promote his talent as a tattoo artist. The stencil of his face is found all over Ireland and is also found on the skin of his followers or his army. "The main aspect of the Brian Kelly Army is tattooing my face on people, which is sort of like graffiti on people. The stencil aspect of the project is to help make people aware of it, but also just to make them wonder what the hell this image is, and then maybe the person will spend time and energy researching. It may at least make people curious. But it is also about marking my territory."
    Kelly is aware of his art and how trends can catch on. "It began as a joke to see if I could get people to get my face tattooed on them when I started tattooing. It became more popular after a few friends got it. To me the project is about making a myth, a sort of big brother figure."
    There is a mythical aspect to graffiti artists as they mostly work at night and use to pseudonyms to avoid being caught red handed by the police. But in London, there is the now annual Cans Festival where hundreds of artists gather to transform a street into a place of explosive colours and images. Anybody can come see who these mystery people are and they can find their favourite artist's work without having to go on a graffiti goose chase. The festival recognises graffiti and stenciling as an art form rather than a criminal offence and artists from all over the world take part to display their work. Corkman Conor Harrington's mural was one of the main attractions there this year as well as Blek Le Rat, who has influenced almost an entire generation of stencilers.
    Graffiti has become almost a fashionable thing now but there are very few outlets for beginners to display their work. It is a punishable crime for the majority of people who take part in street art even though it is still art, just in another medium. Not every graffiti artist can get the celebrity status as easy as Banksy did you know.
  • Where does your coke come from?

    Feb 12 2009, 20:37

    Facing the cool,white surface of a toilet cistern, you lean in and inhale. That €20 bag of confidence will last you the night but if you wish to share with friends you will need more.
    Where did you get it? The man in the smoking area. Where did he get it? From one of those drug lords whom you imagine to look like Vinnie Jones or Phil Mitchell. But where did he get it? If you think long enough, you would say Colombia or somewhere like that. But would you think that the feet of street children were used in its creation?
    Cocaine is made from the coca leaf which is commonly grown and farmed in South America by campesinos (local farmers). In Bolivia, the coca leaf was originally chewed on for nutrients and was believed to be a gift from their ancestors.
    Cocaine is a big business but it is never the big men in charge who will do the dirty work. Homeless children or children with an unpleasant future are lured by the thoughts of wealth by the men who run 'coke pits'. They are promised money, freedom and a life. It is irresistible to them. With over 3,700 children living on the streets of Bolivia, the desire to escape is overwhelming.
    They are loaded away in a truck and will possibly never see their families again. Children of all ages are there. It does not matter how young they are, it is how strong they are that counts.
    They arrive at a plantation where campesinos have been growing the leaves. The growth of coca leaves is not illegal but since the UN's 1988 drug control convention, there is restricted cultivation to prevent its use in illegal drugs.
    From these farms, the children are instructed to carry sacks loaded with coca leaves. They are led to a clearing deep in the jungle so that helicopters can not see the hybrid of illegal activity of child labour and abuse, drug use and the transformation of plant into highly illegal drug .
    The leaf itself accounts for at least half of the country's export revenue. When Ronald Reagan boycotted the import of the coca leaf in 1984, it caused Bolivia's economy to increase by 14,000 per cent. To an already unstable economy, this caused poverty and unemployment to hit rocket heights.
    It is here that they dig the coke pit. The pit is dug in the earth and lined with nothing more than a plastic sheet. The sacks are unloaded here and what surrounds them is their home for the next while.
    Their purpose is to crush the leaves mixed with a combination of acids with their bare feet. The agonising work is numbed by the drug-filled cigarettes and alcohol that the men give them. If they stop working, voices will be raised as well as rifles.
    It takes ten kilograms of coca leaves, four litres of sulphuric acid, two kilograms of sodium carbonate, 37 litres of kerosene, six kilograms of calcium carbonate and 60 litres of water to make one kilogram of cocaine paste. The children have to keep working until enough paste is made so that the men earn a decent profit.
    According to the UN's World Drug Report 2005, one gram of cocaine cost €71 on the street in 2003. The purity ranged from 7-78 per cent. Today, it costs approximately €100 regardless of the purity of the drug. If the children get paid, they will earn maybe 5 Bolivianos a day which is just 55c.
    €500 million worth of cocaine was seized from yacht off the Cork coast this month. This means that children who can't even afford to think of a future for themselves had to crush 500,000 kilograms of coca leaf to make 50,000 kilograms of cocaine.
    Day in, day out this is their job. Their miniscule crushes the contents of the heavy sacks of leaves. The concoction of acids and chemicals bleaches their skin pure white and gets into the blisters that have developed across their bodies. Deep in the jungle, there is no disinfectant and nobody cares about their injuries or if they are tired.
    Once that batch of paste has been made, some of the children will be chosen to run this paste across the border. It will strapped to their bodies which, in the eyes of the men, will now make the children valuable to them.
    Crossing the border can involve swimming across a river or trekking through a jungle full of snakes and spiders. If they are lucky, they might be flown in a drug baron's private jet by a drug baron.
    Survival at this point is often doubtful but under Bolivian law, if a birth is not registered then that person does not exist. These children often disappear forever once the drug lords finish with them.
    Once the paste has landed far away from the jungle where it was created, the process of turning it into the powder that we recognise from movies or through the end of a €50 note.
    The process takes place in a laboratory. The labs may not be as you traditionally imagine them to be. They could be the kitchen of somebody's apartment or just a warehouse in an industrial park.
    Here, the paste is purified with kerosene. Kerosene was once used to kill head lice but was deemed to dangerous for direct contact with the scalp. It is now used as a heating oil.
    Cocaine passes through many hands before it lands in front of you on that toilet cistern. From the campesinos to the children, from the children to the drug lords, from the drug lords onto the labs and then onto whoever sold it to you outside. Inhale. A lot of effort went into that.
  • ITs All That

    Feb 12 2009, 20:35

    “I am the head of IT and I have it on good authority, if you type ‘Google’ into Google, you can break the internet. So, please, no one try it. Even for a joke… It’s not a laughing matter. You can break the internet.”

    And with that, Graham Linehan’s The IT Crowd won the International Emmy Award for Best Comedy last month and deservedly so.

    This award adds to those that the former Coláiste Dhulaigh student has already won from his golden lineage of work. Previously a writer for Hot Press, the Castleknock-er is best known for his work with Arthur Matthews and, of course, the national treasure that is Father Ted. Linehan’s first BAFTA stemmed from the Craggy Island-set show in 1999 for Best Comedy.

    It is a merit to both Linehan’s and Matthews’ work as you see the list of comedians that they have worked with over the years. Almost every Irish comedian from Brendan Grace to Tommy Tiernan featured in Father Ted up until the untimely death of Dermot Morgan in 1997.

    Away from the antics of Craggy Island, the duo are responsible for the love story of Ted, the Irish gardener and Ralph, the sexually-repressed aristocrat of The Fast Show.

    They continued to cause controversy with Channel 4’s Brass Eye. They taught us the priceless lesson of good AIDS and bad AIDS and that apart from death, there is no long-term effect from heroin.
    On Big Train, they gave us the image of The Artist Formerly Known as Prince stalking a herd of jockeys. Big Train exchanged actors like Simon Pegg and Kevin Eldon for cameos in Black Books, which Linehan and Matthews co-wrote with Dylan Moran.

    Black Books earned the lads their second and third BAFTA in 2001 and 2005 for Best Situation Comedy. It starred Bill Bailey and Tamsin Greig and Dylan in the main roles as lovable alcoholics and social outcasts. The dynamic is similar to Linehan’s solo work on The IT Crowd.

    From his back-catalogue, you can see typical Linehan traits throughout The IT Crowd. The Irish humour is injected by Chris O’ Dowd; the nerdy awkwardness by Richard Ayoade; and the feminine touch from Katherine Parkinson. He uses comedians like Chris Morris from Brass Eye and music from The Divine Comedy’s Neil Hannon, who composed the Father Ted theme, as a reference to his past work.

    Now on series three, the international recognition from the Emmys indicates that The IT Crowd may be about to overwhelmingly outshine the already glistening shows under Linehan’s belt.

    Published 14 December 08

    The IT Crowd, Graham Linehan, Father Ted, Big Train, Arthur Matthews, Chris O Dowd, Dermot Morgan
  • Just Jape

    Feb 12 2009, 20:31

    'We took our first pill when the music was shit', sings Richie Egan on his 2004 song Floating which was written about a particularly bad night out in Dublin.
    Better known as Jape, Egan tries not to focus on how bad that night was but tries to 'always pocket the goodness'. Little did he know that the result of that night would later be covered by Jack White and his band The Raconteurs.
    Already with five critically acclaimed albums of his own work and with his other band, Redneck Manifesto, Egan is aware of the downfall that many Irish bands seem to encounter. 'It's easy to reach a certain stage in Ireland. Certain bands get very hyped up and there is only a certain amount that you can do. One of my friends said that if Irish bands make it big, like if you play The Point or the O2, then the only point from there is down', he says.
    His laid back attitude towards music is probably what has kept him going at such a steady pace in the eyes of fans and critics alike. 'The only way to survive long term in music is to not worry about success or failure. Just worry about the songs. But don't chase success because it's an empty pursuit', he advises.
    Modesty is a term that comes to mind when talking to Egan. 'I didn't expect so may people to be there and they knew all of the lyrics,' he says about the packed to capacity crowd at this year's Electric Picnic.
    His set was before Christy Moore and The Stunning played in the neighbouring tent at the same time. 'The portal opened up that night' he says as he and two of Ireland's greatest acts took over a plot of land in Stradbally, Co. Laois.
    His third album, Ritual, has big expectations from fans. There is an online campaign led by blogger Nialler9 to get his song Phil Lynott as this year's Christmas number one.
    Egan doubts that it will happen and predicts that the contestants from The X Factor will probably be number one.'They're covering Hallelujah by Leonard Cohen or something.'
    He marvels at the concept of The X Factor. 'Its good for the kids and it's funny to watch. It's entertaining in a weird way, sort of psychedelic that it exists. It's hard to believe that they are actually real people...'
    Even though Ritual has just been released, he has begun writing new material which started in Ventry, Co. Kerry. 'I usually write about day to day life but it was cool to get out of Dublin. It kickstarts you into thinking because there is nothing else to do there.'
    'It's a beautiful part of the country but I had no car. Four of five days is usually my limit but I was there for 10 days and started to miss humans..'
    He is hoping to play some of this new material at his gig in Tripod on 18th December and maybe Phil Lynott will be on its way to number one.

    Published 11 December 08 Jape